Daily Flash

Half Mag / Half Zine

Jordan Reeves is just an ordinary 14-year-old girl who has inspired millions of people with her extraordinary “superpower.”

The young inventor from Columbia, Missouri was born with a left arm that stopped developing beyond the elbow. Although some people would look at her under-developed limb as just a disability, Jordan used her condition to launch her superhero alter ego.

When she was 10 years old, Jordan attended a STEM workshop that encouraged kids with disabilities to think creatively about their condition—so with a 3D-printer at her disposal, she designed her own prosthetic arm that could shoot glitter from the tip.

Jordan’s invention was so dazzlingly successful, she went on to talk about her horn-shaped “Project Unicorn” prosthetic design on the TEDx stage, Shark Tank, and even The Rachel Ray Show. With each appearance, she hoped that Project Unicorn would encourage other kids to view disabilities as gifts rather than hindrances.

As Project Unicorn gained more traction, Jordan and her mother turned their labor of love into the Born Just Right nonprofit so they could continue advocating for inclusivity.

In addition to publishing a book about her experiences in 2019, Jordan and her prosthetic were featured on Episode One of Marvel’s Superhero Project—and earlier this week, she was featured on a new LEGO documentary miniseries that interviews young change-makers from across North America.

All of the kids featured on the Rebuild the World video series were asked to showcase their unique brand of brick-building creativity by contributing their own LEGO creation to a massive 13-foot globe.

More than 430 children from 30 different countries contributed to the installation, which is made up of a whopping 350,000 bricks. Not only that, the documentary series was produced by kids.

“It’s an invitation,” reads the LEGO website’s project description. “Where adults see challenges, kids see opportunities. Imagine what we could do if we all saw the world through a child’s eyes!”